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Image source: UNICEF

There is so much uncertainty about the resumption of schools in Kenya, and parents are grappling with anxiety at the looming increase in tuition fees. The pandemic has also widened inequality as kids from disadvantaged backgrounds could not continue with education online like the others.
Emma Nyabisi (Kenya)

The pandemic has caused a disconnect in the flow of the curriculum, and teachers who couldn’t hold virtual classes with their students during the lockdown might have a challenge teaching the students what they missed over the past months while catching up with the latest curriculum as stipulated by the government.
Oyindamola Oseni (Nigeria)

The government established a new academic calendar that allowed for easy assimilation back to school.
In times of global crisis, when there is no coordinated action led by public power, only the fittest (richest) manages to succeed.
Constant (Benin Republic)

The COVID-19 affected the education system negatively regarding ITC compliance. We can see that most teachers and lecturers can’t operate efficiently in an ITC driven system; even a large % of students have no access to smartphone or e-learning facilities in their communities.
Roland Fide (Nigeria)

In Kenya, there has been a high rise in teenage pregnancies and child marriage during this period as children are less engaged academically.
In addition to this, we have an increased number of learners being recruited into the Al-Shabaab militia group in the North-Eastern part of Kenya. The area most affected is prone to youth radicalization owing to the low literacy levels. The closure of schools greatly reversed the efforts of public officers who have over the years sensitized the community on the importance of education.
Caleb and Jacqueline Talay, (Kenya)

Many school children have been out of school for long they hardly remember most things they were taught. Some of them are on edge of giving up on education as they’ve moved on to learning trade, farming, and hawking while some of them just stay home with no hope of getting back to learning again.
Segun Okeowo (Nigeria)

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